Courtesy of The Mediated Matter Group From Cooper Hewitt: Neri Oxman’s Aguahoja, which exemplifies the National Design Award winner’s advancement of material ecology, a design approach that seeks to unify nature’s material intelligence with engineering, computation and digital fabrication. The project culminates in a pavilion made from 3D printed panels of plant cellulose and chitosan, a material made from the chitin present in invertebrate shells.

Courtesy of The Mediated Matter Group From Cooper Hewitt: Neri Oxman’s Aguahoja, which exemplifies the National Design Award winner’s advancement of material ecology, a design approach that seeks to unify nature’s material intelligence with engineering, computation and digital fabrication. The project culminates in a pavilion made from 3D printed panels of plant cellulose and chitosan, a material made from the chitin present in invertebrate shells.

As a polar vortex sweeps across the nation, we are again forced to confront the new realities of a changing climate. Luckily, some architects and designers are collaborating with scientists, engineers, and environmentalists to develop solutions to social and environmental issues caused by global warming. To highlight this work, the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and Cube design museum in Kerkrade, Netherlands, are assembling more than 60 projects by these professionals for the upcoming “Nature—Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial” exhibition, which will be on view concurrently at the Cooper Hewitt in New York City and at Cube from May 10 until Jan. 20, 2020.

Ed Reeve From Cooper Hewitt: Curiosity Cloud by Austrian design duo Mischer’Traxler, which celebrates biodiversity while inviting meditation on nature’s fragility. The installation is composed of glass bulbs, each containing a handmade insect species that is native to New York. When visitors walk through the installation, the insects flutter.

Ed Reeve From Cooper Hewitt: Curiosity Cloud by Austrian design duo Mischer’Traxler, which celebrates biodiversity while inviting meditation on nature’s fragility. The installation is composed of glass bulbs, each containing a handmade insect species that is native to New York. When visitors walk through the installation, the insects flutter.

“With 2018 [as] the Earth’s fourth-warmest year on record and global carbon emissions at an all-time high, the crisis of human-caused climate change has never been more dire,” said Caroline Baumann, director of Cooper Hewitt in a press release. “Solutions will not emerge without radical new thinking and alliances. ‘Nature’ brings together some of the most creative and intelligent designers whose works address our complex relationship to nature and its precious resources and advocate for greater empathy for our planet.”