Larson O'Brien Millennial architects are playing a far greater role in their firms today, and their influence is having a real impact on how products and brands get chosen for a building project.

Larson O’Brien Millennial architects are playing a far greater role in their firms today, and their influence is having a real impact on how products and brands get chosen for a building project.

If you are a building products manufacturer (BPM) and architects have an influence on the purchase decision of your products, you have some understanding of the architect market and what makes them tick. And if your brand has identified the architect as a primary target audience, you’ll likely have an in-depth database of this audience – a list of key architectural firms, architect’s names in your database, and a sales team with established relationships with architects who have used and/or considered your brand.

Maybe your marketing team even developed a target persona identifying the characteristics of the decision-maker of the architectural firm; something like this – a confident, 40-something hard-working partner in the firm who yearns for recognition by peers, clients, and the community for impactful designs and solutions.

But how many BPM brands have the millennial architect on their radar? This architect segment is playing a far greater role in their firms today than ever before, and their influence is having a real impact on how products and brands get chosen for a building project.

I spoke with LarsonO’Brien’s CMO and director of account services, Dave Sladack, who works with BPMs every day to create accurate and actionable personas. He explains eight key factors that come into play when it comes to developing strong relationships with millennial architects:

1. Pure size

“Millennials currently make up the largest generation in the workforce,” says Sladack. “According to Pew Research, Millennials made up 35% of the U.S. workforce in 2016, and that percentage is expected to quickly grow as more Baby Boomers reach retirement.”