The Neue Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart, Germany, by James Stirling

The Neue Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart, Germany, by James Stirling

Is the plan still the generator? For generations, architects have used Le Corbusier’s phrase to base their designs on an apportionment of spaces that looks good on paper. How much of that beauty came from the graphic balance on a sheet and how much from how those notations represent a harmonious relation and sequence of spaces is always a subject open to debate. Nowadays, however, architectural beauty is something we associate more with the fluidity of form allowed by technology or the articulation of elements in a way that highlights what remains of the discipline’s craft. Computer skills allow us to think and visualize our spaces fully in three dimensions, so is the way the plan looks and works still relevant?