MIT Self-Assembly Lab

In the Maldives, MIT experiment fights rising sea levels with nature

Growing Islands harness natural wave forces to build underwater sand buffers By Liz Stinson As our environmental prognosis grows increasingly grim, designers have started to think about ways to mitigate what feels like an an inevitable crash course with nature. Cities along the...
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Cities are measuring their carbon emissions all wrong

New report offers sobering look at shortfalls in current climate plans, and radical solutions that can make a difference. Radical solutions to make up the shortfall, courtesy of a new report By Patrick Sisson As alarming new climate news has become a daily part of the media...
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via Dezeen

“We’re seeing an unprecedented mobilisation of architects in the fight against climate change”

With architects changing in response to global warming, Phineas Harper asks: what does radical architecture look like in the era of climate change? Phineas Harper With architects changing their ways in response to global warming, Phineas Harper asks: what does radical...
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Courtesy Ryan Peltier

The Building Sector May Be Our Best Hope for Averting Climate Change

Architects have enormous sway in specifying building materials and modes of operation; they also best understand the barriers facing zero-carbon designs. by Audrey Gray You can be forgiven for side-eyeing another “sustainability” panel. In a spring of dire climate predictions...
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Storm clouds rolling across the ocean. (Courtesy NASA)

Heavy hitters of U.K. architecture declare a “climate emergency”

The architecture and construction industries have a responsibility to mitigate the worst of climate change, according to 17 of the U.K.’s largest firms. By Jonathan Hilburg A group of 17 architecture firms from across the United Kingdom, released an open letter affirming...
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Salk plant via Dezeen

Salk Institute develops a plant that offers a solution to climate change

California’s Salk Institute for Biological Studies is developing a plant that can store excess carbon dioxide in its roots, in a bid to curb the effects of climate change. Augusta Pownall California’s Salk Institute for Biological Studies is developing a plant that...
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Seon-Yeong Kwak Illumination of a book with the nanobionic light-emitting plants (two three-and-a-half-week-old watercress plants). The book and the light-emitting watercress plants were placed in front of a reflective paper to increase the influence from the light emitting plants to the book pages.

A Lesson on People, Place, and Plants

Sheila Kennedy and MIT researchers team up to introduce bioluminescent plants into architecture. By Blaine Brownell Even without the billion-plus people who still lack access to electricity, global electrical networks are under considerable stress. The aging and unreliable U.S....
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How the Ancient Maya Adapted to Climate Change

Instead of focusing on the civilization’s final stages, looking at Mayan adaptations shows how their communities survived for as long as they did. Kenneth Seligson This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.Carbon dioxide concentrations...
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Designing the Butterfly-Friendly City

With the population of the distinctive species in decline, cities around the U.S. are trying to add monarch-friendly spaces. Allison C. Meier One of the exhibits on view at the Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial, which just opened at the Smithsonian’s design museum in New York, is a...
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(Ian Froome/Via Unsplash) via ArchPaper

Are design professionals liable for failing to anticipate the effects of climate change?

Two experts give advice to architects about their legal liability in designing for climate change in their projects—just following code may not be enough. By Larry Dany and Nick Boyd We do not need more vivid reminders that extreme weather events have the potential to cause...
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