This story was first published in Public Works.

Adobe Stock/naypong The U.S. DOT and Federal Aviation Administration received almost 150 applications for a program where state and local governments partner with the private sector to test drones for all kinds of uses.

Adobe Stock/naypong The U.S. DOT and Federal Aviation Administration received almost 150 applications for a program where state and local governments partner with the private sector to test drones for all kinds of uses.

The Kansas DOT wants to see if a drone can find a stranded motorist. North Carolina DOT is partnering with software companies to develop traffic management systems that track drones as they fly. Lee County Mosquito Control District in Ft. Myers, Fla., will use a 1,500-lb. drone to apply insecticide and survey pest populations.

These are a few experiments that will be conducted over the next three years by 10 successful Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration Pilot Program applicants (149 proposals were submitted). The program, which was announced in October 2017, partners the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with local, state, and tribal governments, which then partner with the private sector to gather data on night operations, flights over people and beyond pilot’s line of sight, package delivery, detect-and-avoid technologies, and the reliability and security of data links between pilot and aircraft. No federal funding is provided.